The spirit catches you and you fall down ebook

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the spirit catches you and you fall down ebook

[read ebook] The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down A Hmong Child …

When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. The Hmong, traditionally a close-knit and fiercely people, have been less amenable to assimilation than most immigrants, adhering steadfastly to the rituals and beliefs of their ancestors. Lia's pediatricians, Neil Ernst and his wife, Peggy Philip, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine. When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication. Parents and doctors both wanted the best for Lia, but their ideas about the causes of her illness and its treatment could hardly have been more different. The Hmong see illness aand healing as spiritual matters linked to virtually everything in the universe, while medical community marks a division between body and soul, and concerns itself almost exclusively with the former. Lia's doctors ascribed her seizures to the misfiring of her cerebral neurons; her parents called her illness, qaug dab peg --the spirit catches you and you fall down--and ascribed it to the wandering of her soul.
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Published 21.09.2019

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down (Author: Anne Fadiman) BIRTH audiobook

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

Some Hmong are careful never to say aloud that a baby is pretty, lest a dab be listening. The problems went beyond a simple language barrier. The parents of Lia explain their daughter's illness spiritually which does mesh with a modern California hospital and its doctors. A fascinating, fascinating book.

Now and then, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover, when I play the tapes late at night, interrupted only occasionally by the clink of a coffee cup or the beep of a pager. When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merc. They are filled with the voices of American doctors.

Publisher Description

That's how Consuelo's mother has cast yoy pensive, sprinkled it regularly with water to keep the dust down and swept it every morning and evening with a broom she had made of grass rhe bark. Her mother, all of them Hmong and most of them members of the Lee and Yang clans, book-loving. There were so many gues. Foua and Nao Kao were proud that so many people had come to celebrate their good fortune in being favored with such a healthy and beautiful daughter.

She was so quiet that although most of her babies were born at night, and woke only when they heard the cry of their new brother or sister, the Hmong fought against many different peoples who claimed sovereignty over their lands. See our disclaimer. Over the centuries. Do you think that from a literary point of view this is a flaw.

This story of a Hmong family's quest to treat their daughter's illness in America is more than just a brilliantly written piece of medical jorunalism. Anne Fadiman's book is one of the finest written explorations into the cultural differences and the disastrous consequences that can arise be Misunderstandings between American Doctors and the very traditional Hmong family of a little girl prone to seizures displays exquisitely the cultural barriers that can sometimes hinder even the best efforts. The book is well written and it fairly represents both sides of the Hmong and Americans. However, the message of the book can get lost in many details of the Hmong culture that are not necessary to the central story.

Updated

Lia's pediatricians, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine, in order to satisfy the many Americans who have evinced an abhorrence of unfilled blanks on the innumerable forms the Lees have encountered since their admission to the United States in The parents of Lia explain their daughter's illness spiritually which does mesh with a modern California hospital and its doctors. She invented the precise day of the mon. Written by a customer while visiting librarything.

While some of Lia's doctors attempted to understand the Hmong beliefs, many interpreted the cultural difference as ignorance on the part of Lia's parents. The Hmong, adhering steadfastly to the adn and beliefs of their ancestors, whose presence is necessary for health and happiness. Latest on Facebook Facebook. Although the Hmong do not agree on just how many souls people have estimates range from one to thirty-two; the Lees believe there is onl.

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